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21 C.F.R. PART 123 —

FISH AND FISHERY PRODUCTS

[Code of Federal Regulations] [Title 21, Volume 2] [Revised as of April 1, 2003]
From the U.S. Government Printing Office via GPO Access
[CITE: 21CFR123.3] [Page 270-271]

This material is from the FSIS/USDA website located here.

Our HACCP Plan Development for Food Processors course meets the educational requirements set out in the
FSIS/USDA regulation requiring HACCP for seafood (21CFR123).

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§ 123.3

Definitions

§ 123.5

Current good manufacturing practice

§ 123.6

Hazard analysis and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan

§ 123.7

Corrective actions

§ 123.8

Verification

§ 123.9

Records

§ 123.10

Training

§ 123.11

Sanitation control procedures

§ 123.12

Special requirements for imported products

§ 123.15

General

§ 123.16

Process controls

§ 123.20

General

§ 123.28

Source controls

Sec. 123.6 Hazard analysis and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

(a) Hazard analysis. Every processor shall conduct, or have conducted for it, a hazard analysis to determine whether there are food safety hazards that are reasonably likely to occur for each kind of fish and fishery product processed by that processor and to identify the preventive measures that the processor can apply to control those hazards. Such food safety hazards can be introduced both within and outside the processing plant environment, including food safety hazards that can occur before, during, and after harvest. A food safety hazard that is reasonably likely to occur is one for which a prudent processor would establish controls because experience, illness data, scientific reports, or other information provide a basis to conclude that there is a reasonable possibility that it will occur in the particular type of fish or fishery product being processed in the absence of those controls.

(b) The HACCP plan. Every processor shall have and implement a written HACCP plan whenever a hazard analysis reveals one or more food safety hazards that are reasonably likely to occur, as described in paragraph

(a) of this section. A HACCP plan shall be specific to:

(1) Each location where fish and fishery products are processed by that processor; and

(2) Each kind of fish and fishery product processed by the processor. The

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plan may group kinds of fish and fishery products together, or group kinds of production methods together, if the food safety hazards, critical control points, critical limits, and procedures required to be identified and performed in paragraph (c) of this section are identical for all fish and fishery products so grouped or for all production methods so grouped.

(c) The contents of the HACCP plan. The HACCP plan shall, at a minimum:

(1) List the food safety hazards that are reasonably likely to occur, as identified in accordance with paragraph

(a) of this section, and that thus must be controlled for each fish and fishery product. Consideration should be given to whether any food safety hazards are reasonably likely to occur as a result of the following:

(i) Natural toxins;

(ii) Microbiological contamination;

(iii) Chemical contamination;

(iv) Pesticides;

(v) Drug residues;

(vi) Decomposition in scombroid toxin-forming species or in any other species where a food safety hazard has been associated with decomposition;

(vii) Parasites, where the processor has knowledge or has reason to know that the parasite-containing fish or fishery product will be consumed without a process sufficient to kill the parasites, or where the processor represents, labels, or intends for the product to be so consumed;

(viii) Unapproved use of direct or indirect food or color additives; and

(ix) Physical hazards;

(2) List the critical control points for each of the identified food safety hazards, including as appropriate:

(i) Critical control points designed to control food safety hazards that could be introduced in the processing plant environment; and

(ii) Critical control points designed to control food safety hazards introduced outside the processing plant environment, including food safety hazards that occur before, during, and after harvest;

(3) List the critical limits that must be met at each of the critical control points;

(4) List the procedures, and frequency thereof, that will be used to monitor each of the critical control points to ensure compliance with the critical limits;

(5) Include any corrective action plans that have been developed in accordance with Sec. 123.7(b), to be followed in response to deviations from critical limits at critical control points;

(6) List the verification procedures, and frequency thereof, that the processor will use in accordance with Sec. 123.8(a);

(7) Provide for a recordkeeping system that documents the monitoring of the critical control points. The records shall contain the actual values and observations obtained during monitoring.

(d) Signing and dating the HACCP plan.

(1) The HACCP plan shall be signed and dated, either by the most responsible individual onsite at the processing facility or by a higher level official of the processor. This signature shall signify that the HACCP plan has been accepted for implementation by the firm.

(2) The HACCP plan shall be dated and signed:

(i) Upon initial acceptance;

(ii) Upon any modification; and

(iii) Upon verification of the plan in accordance with Sec. 123.8(a)(1).

(e) Products subject to other regulations. For fish and fishery products that are subject to the requirements of part 113 or 114 of this chapter, the HACCP plan need not list the food safety hazard associated with the formation of Clostridium botulinum toxin in the finished, hermetically sealed container, nor list the controls to prevent that food safety hazard. A HACCP plan for such fish and fishery products shall address any other food safety hazards that are reasonably likely to occur.

(f) Sanitation. Sanitation controls may be included in the HACCP plan. However, to the extent that they are monitored in accordance with Sec. 123.11

(b) they need not be included in the HACCP plan, and vice versa.

(g) Legal basis. Failure of a processor to have and implement a HACCP plan that complies with this section whenever a HACCP plan is necessary, otherwise operate in accordance with the requirements of this part, shall render the fish or fishery products of that processor adulterated under section

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402(a)(4) of the act. Whether a processor's actions are consistent with ensuring the safety of food will be determined through an evaluation of the processors overall implementation of its HACCP plan, if one is required.

 

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